Weekend Rewind: Hope + Opportunity

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This past weekend, Pastor Micah looked at Acts 24-26 CSB

11 Five days later Ananias the high priest came down with some elders and a lawyer named Tertullus. These men presented their case against Paul to the governor.  
2 When Paul was called in, Tertullus began to accuse him and said: “We enjoy great peace because of you, and reforms are taking place for the benefit of this nation because of your foresight.  
3 We acknowledge this in every way and everywhere, most excellent Felix, with utmost gratitude.  
4 But, so that I will not burden you any further, I request that you would be kind enough to give us a brief hearing.  
5 For we have found this man to be a plague, an agitator among all the Jews throughout the Roman world, and a ringleader of the sect of the Nazarenes.  
6 He even tried to desecrate the temple, and so we apprehended him. By examining him yourself you will be able to discern the truth about these charges we are bringing against him.”  
9 The Jews also joined in the attack, alleging that these things were true. 
10 When the governor motioned for him to speak, Paul replied: “Because I know you have been a judge of this nation for many years, I am glad to offer my defense in what concerns me.  
11 You can verify for yourself that it is no more than twelve days since I went up to worship in Jerusalem.  
12 They didn’t find me arguing with anyone or causing a disturbance among the crowd, either in the temple or in the synagogues or anywhere in the city.  
13 Neither can they prove the charges they are now making against me.  
14 But I admit this to you: I worship the God of my ancestors according to the Way, which they call a sect, believing everything that is in accordance with the law and written in the prophets.  
15 I have a hope in God, which these men themselves also accept, that there will be a resurrection, both of the righteous and the unrighteous.  
16 I always strive to have a clear conscience toward God and men.  
17 After many years, I came to bring charitable gifts and offerings to my people.  
18 While I was doing this, some Jews from Asia found me ritually purified in the temple, without a crowd and without any uproar.  
19 It is they who ought to be here before you to bring charges, if they have anything against me.  
20 Or let these men here state what wrongdoing they found in me when I stood before the Sanhedrin,  
21 other than this one statement I shouted while standing among them, ‘Today I am on trial before you concerning the resurrection of the dead.’” 
22 Since Felix was well informed about the Way, he adjourned the hearing, saying, “When Lysias the commander comes down, I will decide your case.”  
23 He ordered that the centurion keep Paul under guard, though he could have some freedom, and that he should not prevent any of his friends from meeting his needs. 
24 Several days later, when Felix came with his wife Drusilla, who was Jewish, he sent for Paul and listened to him on the subject of faith in Christ Jesus.  
25 Now as he spoke about righteousness, self-control, and the judgment to come, Felix became afraid and replied, “Leave for now, but when I have an opportunity I’ll call for you.”  
26 At the same time he was also hoping that Paul would offer him money. So he sent for him quite often and conversed with him. 
27 After two years had passed, Porcius Festus succeeded Felix, and because Felix wanted to do the Jews a favor, he left Paul in prison. 
Acts 25
1 Three days after Festus arrived in the province, he went up to Jerusalem from Caesarea.  
2 The chief priests and the leaders of the Jews presented their case against Paul to him; and they appealed,  
3 asking for a favor against Paul, that Festus summon him to Jerusalem. They were, in fact, preparing an ambush along the road to kill him.  
4 Festus, however, answered that Paul should be kept at Caesarea, and that he himself was about to go there shortly.  
5 “Therefore,” he said, “let those of you who have authority go down with me and accuse him, if he has done anything wrong.” 
6 When he had spent not more than eight or ten days among them, he went down to Caesarea. The next day, seated at the tribunal, he commanded Paul to be brought in.  
7 When he arrived, the Jews who had come down from Jerusalem stood around him and brought many serious charges that they were not able to prove.  
8 Then Paul made his defense: “Neither against the Jewish law, nor against the temple, nor against Caesar have I sinned in any way.” 
9 But Festus, wanting to do the Jews a favor, replied to Paul, “Are you willing to go up to Jerusalem to be tried before me there on these charges?” 
10 Paul replied: “I am standing at Caesar’s tribunal, where I ought to be tried. I have done no wrong to the Jews, as even you yourself know very well.  
11 If then I did anything wrong and am deserving of death, I am not trying to escape death; but if there is nothing to what these men accuse me of, no one can give me up to them. I appeal to Caesar!” 
12 Then after Festus conferred with his council, he replied, “You have appealed to Caesar; to Caesar you will go.” 
13 Several days later, King Agrippa and Bernice arrived in Caesarea and paid a courtesy call on Festus.  
14 Since they were staying there several days, Festus presented Paul’s case to the king, saying, “There’s a man who was left as a prisoner by Felix.  
15 When I was in Jerusalem, the chief priests and the elders of the Jews presented their case and asked that he be condemned.  
16 I answered them that it is not the Roman custom to give someone up before the accused faces the accusers and has an opportunity for a defense against the charges. 
17 So when they had assembled here, I did not delay. The next day I took my seat at the tribunal and ordered the man to be brought in.  
18 The accusers stood up but brought no charge against him of the evils I was expecting. 
19 Instead they had some disagreements with him about their own religion and about a certain Jesus, a dead man Paul claimed to be alive.  
20 Since I was at a loss in a dispute over such things, I asked him if he wanted to go to Jerusalem and be tried there regarding these matters.  
21 But when Paul appealed to be held for trial by the Emperor, I ordered him to be kept in custody until I could send him to Caesar.” 
22 Agrippa said to Festus, “I would like to hear the man myself.” 
“Tomorrow you will hear him,” he replied. 
23 So the next day, Agrippa and Bernice came with great pomp and entered the auditorium with the military commanders and prominent men of the city. When Festus gave the command, Paul was brought in.  
24 Then Festus said: “King Agrippa and all men present with us, you see this man. The whole Jewish community has appealed to me concerning him, both in Jerusalem and here, shouting that he should not live any longer.  
25 I found that he had not done anything deserving of death, but when he himself appealed to the Emperor, I decided to send him.  
26 I have nothing definite to write to my lord about him. Therefore, I have brought him before all of you, and especially before you, King Agrippa, so that after this examination is over, I may have something to write.  
27 For it seems unreasonable to me to send a prisoner without indicating the charges against him.” 
Acts 26
Agrippa said to Paul, “You have permission to speak for yourself.” 
Then Paul stretched out his hand and began his defense:  
2 “I consider myself fortunate, that it is before you, King Agrippa, I am to make my defense today against all the accusations of the Jews,  
3 especially since you are very knowledgeable about all the Jewish customs and controversies. Therefore I beg you to listen to me patiently. 
4 “All the Jews know my way of life from my youth, which was spent from the beginning among my own people and in Jerusalem.  
5 They have known me for a long time, if they are willing to testify, that according to the strictest sect of our religion I lived as a Pharisee.  
6 And now I stand on trial because of the hope in what God promised to our ancestors,  
7 the promise our twelve tribes hope to reach as they earnestly serve him night and day. King Agrippa, I am being accused by the Jews because of this hope.  
8 Why do any of you consider it incredible that God raises the dead?  
9 In fact, I myself was convinced that it was necessary to do many things in opposition to the name of Jesus of Nazareth.  
10 I actually did this in Jerusalem, and I locked up many of the saints in prison, since I had received authority for that from the chief priests. When they were put to death, I was in agreement against them.  
11 In all the synagogues I often punished them and tried to make them blaspheme. Since I was terribly enraged at them, I pursued them even to foreign cities. 
12 “I was traveling to Damascus under these circumstances with authority and a commission from the chief priests.  
13 King Agrippa, while on the road at midday, I saw a light from heaven brighter than the sun, shining around me and those traveling with me.  
14 We all fell to the ground, and I heard a voice speaking to me in Aramaic, ‘Saul, Saul, why are you persecuting me? It is hard for you to kick against the goads.’ 
15 “I asked, ‘Who are you, Lord?’ 
“And the Lord replied: ‘I am Jesus, the one you are persecuting.  
16 But get up and stand on your feet. For I have appeared to you for this purpose, to appoint you as a servant and a witness of what you have seen and will see of me.  
17 I will rescue you from your people and from the Gentiles. I am sending you to them  
18 to open their eyes so that they may turn from darkness to light and from the power of Satan to God, that they may receive forgiveness of sins and a share among those who are sanctified by faith in me.’ 
19 “So then, King Agrippa, I was not disobedient to the heavenly vision.  
20 Instead, I preached to those in Damascus first, and to those in Jerusalem and in all the region of Judea, and to the Gentiles, that they should repent and turn to God, and do works worthy of repentance.  
21 For this reason the Jews seized me in the temple and were trying to kill me.  
22 To this very day, I have had help from God, and I stand and testify to both small and great, saying nothing other than what the prophets and Moses said would take place—  
23 that the Messiah must suffer, and that, as the first to rise from the dead, he would proclaim light to our people and to the Gentiles.” 
24 As he was saying these things in his defense, Festus exclaimed in a loud voice, “You’re out of your mind, Paul! Too much study is driving you mad.” 
25 But Paul replied, “I’m not out of my mind, most excellent Festus. On the contrary, I’m speaking words of truth and good judgment.  
26 For the king knows about these matters, and I can speak boldly to him. For I am convinced that none of these things has escaped his notice, since this was not done in a corner.  
27 King Agrippa, do you believe the prophets? I know you believe.” 
28 Agrippa said to Paul, “Are you going to persuade me to become a Christian so easily?” 
29 “I wish before God,” replied Paul, “that whether easily or with difficulty, not only you but all who listen to me today might become as I am—except for these chains.” 
30 The king, the governor, Bernice, and those sitting with them got up,  
31 and when they had left they talked with each other and said, “This man is not doing anything to deserve death or imprisonment.” 
32 Agrippa said to Festus, “This man could have been released if he had not appealed to Caesar.” 

Sermon Notes
1. We center our hope in the resurrection.
2. The Gospel is our purpose.

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We publish new sermons to our podcast feed on a weekly basis. If you are traveling on the weekend, have to miss the sermon due to work, or just want a refresher before you go deeper on the text in your Life group, the Brainerd Baptist Church podcast will be a helpful resource for you.

 

 

 

 

Weekend Rewind: The Cost of Sacrifice

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This past weekend, Pastor Micah looked at 2 Samuel 24:18-25 CSB

18 Gad came to David that day and said to him, “Go up and set up an altar to the Lord on the threshing floor of Araunah the Jebusite.”  
19 David went up in obedience to Gad’s command, just as the Lord had commanded.  
20 Araunah looked down and saw the king and his servants coming toward him, so he went out and paid homage to the king with his face to the ground. 
21 Araunah said, “Why has my lord the king come to his servant?” 
David replied, “To buy the threshing floor from you in order to build an altar to the Lord, so the plague on the people may be halted.” 
22 Araunah said to David, “My lord the king may take whatever he wants and offer it. Here are the oxen for a burnt offering and the threshing sledges and ox yokes for the wood.  
23 Your Majesty, Araunah gives everything here to the king.” Then he said to the king, “May the Lord your God accept you.” 
24 The king answered Araunah, “No, I insist on buying it from you for a price, for I will not offer to the Lord my God burnt offerings that cost me nothing.” David bought the threshing floor and the oxen for twenty ounces of silver.  
25 He built an altar to the Lord there and offered burnt offerings and fellowship offerings. Then the Lord was receptive to prayer for the land, and the plague on Israel ended. 

Sermon Notes
1. Worship is sacrificial.
2. Worship is challenging.
3. Worship is costly.

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Life Group Notes
Life Group Guide
Life Group Leader's Guide

Sermon Podcast
We publish new sermons to our podcast feed on a weekly basis. If you are traveling on the weekend, have to miss the sermon due to work, or just want a refresher before you go deeper on the text in your Life group, the Brainerd Baptist Church podcast will be a helpful resource for you.

 

 

 

 

Weekend Rewind: Endure In The Midst of Opposition

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This past weekend, Pastor Will looked at Acts 22:30-23:1-35 CSB

30 The next day, since he wanted to find out exactly why Paul was being accused by the Jews, he released him and instructed the chief priests and all the Sanhedrin to convene. He brought Paul down and placed him before them.
Acts 23
1 Paul looked straight at the Sanhedrin and said, “Brothers, I have lived my life before God in all good conscience to this day.” 
2 The high priest Ananias ordered those who were standing next to him to strike him on the mouth. 
3 Then Paul said to him, “God is going to strike you, you whitewashed wall! You are sitting there judging me according to the law, and yet in violation of the law are you ordering me to be struck?” 
4 Those standing nearby said, “Do you dare revile God’s high priest?” 
5 “I did not know, brothers, that he was the high priest,” replied Paul. “For it is written, You must not speak evil of a ruler of your people.” 
6 When Paul realized that one part of them were Sadducees and the other part were Pharisees, he cried out in the Sanhedrin, “Brothers, I am a Pharisee, a son of Pharisees. I am being judged because of the hope of the resurrection of the dead!” 
7 When he said this, a dispute broke out between the Pharisees and the Sadducees, and the assembly was divided. 
8 For the Sadducees say there is no resurrection, and neither angel nor spirit, but the Pharisees affirm them all. 
9 The shouting grew loud, and some of the scribes of the Pharisees’ party got up and argued vehemently: “We find nothing evil in this man. What if a spirit or an angel has spoken to him?” 
10 When the dispute became violent, the commander feared that Paul might be torn apart by them and ordered the troops to go down, take him away from them, and bring him into the barracks. 
11 The following night, the Lord stood by him and said, “Have courage! For as you have testified about me in Jerusalem, so it is necessary for you to testify in Rome.” 
12 When it was morning, the Jews formed a conspiracy and bound themselves under a curse not to eat or drink until they had killed Paul. 
13 There were more than forty who had formed this plot. 
14 These men went to the chief priests and elders and said, “We have bound ourselves under a solemn curse that we won’t eat anything until we have killed Paul. 
15 So now you, along with the Sanhedrin, make a request to the commander that he bring him down to you as if you were going to investigate his case more thoroughly. But, before he gets near, we are ready to kill him.” 
16 But the son of Paul’s sister, hearing about their ambush, came and entered the barracks and reported it to Paul. 
17 Paul called one of the centurions and said, “Take this young man to the commander, because he has something to report to him.” 
18 So he took him, brought him to the commander, and said, “The prisoner Paul called me and asked me to bring this young man to you, because he has something to tell you.”
19 The commander took him by the hand, led him aside, and inquired privately, “What is it you have to report to me?” 
20 “The Jews,” he said, “have agreed to ask you to bring Paul down to the Sanhedrin tomorrow, as though they are going to hold a somewhat more careful inquiry about him. 
21 Don’t let them persuade you, because there are more than forty of them lying in ambush—men who have bound themselves under a curse not to eat or drink until they have killed him. Now they are ready, waiting for your consent.” 
22 So the commander dismissed the young man and instructed him, “Don’t tell anyone that you have informed me about this.” 
23 He summoned two of his centurions and said, “Get two hundred soldiers ready with seventy cavalry and two hundred spearmen to go to Caesarea at nine tonight. 
24 Also provide mounts for Paul to ride and bring him safely to Felix the governor.” 
25 He wrote the following letter: 
26 Claudius Lysias, 
To the most excellent governor Felix: 
Greetings. 
27 When this man had been seized by the Jews and was about to be killed by them, I arrived with my troops and rescued him because I learned that he is a Roman citizen. 
28 Wanting to know the charge they were accusing him of, I brought him down before their Sanhedrin. 
29 I found out that the accusations were concerning questions of their law, and that there was no charge that merited death or imprisonment. 
30 When I was informed that there was a plot against the man, I sent him to you right away. I also ordered his accusers to state their case against him in your presence. 
31 So the soldiers took Paul during the night and brought him to Antipatris as they were ordered. 
32 The next day, they returned to the barracks, allowing the cavalry to go on with him. 
33 When these men entered Caesarea and delivered the letter to the governor, they also presented Paul to him. 
34 After he read it, he asked what province he was from. When he learned he was from Cilicia, 
35 he said, “I will give you a hearing whenever your accusers also get here.” He ordered that he be kept under guard in Herod’s palace.

Sermon Notes
1. We can endure because of His Word.
2. We trust that God will accomplish His purposes and plans.

Sermon Video

Life Group Notes
Life Group Guide
Life Group Leader's Guide

Sermon Podcast
We publish new sermons to our podcast feed on a weekly basis. If you are traveling on the weekend, have to miss the sermon due to work, or just want a refresher before you go deeper on the text in your Life group, the Brainerd Baptist Church podcast will be a helpful resource for you.